Preventing a Common Cold

There’s no vaccine for the common cold, but you can take common-sense precautions to slow the spread of cold viruses:

  • Wash your hands. Clean your hands thoroughly and often with soap and water, and teach your children the importance of hand-washing. If soap and water aren’t available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Disinfect your stuff. Clean kitchen and bathroom countertops with disinfectant, especially when someone in your family has a cold. Wash children’s toys periodically.
  • Use tissues. Sneeze and cough into tissues. Discard used tissues right away, then wash your hands carefully.
  • Teach children to sneeze or cough into the bend of their elbow when they don’t have a tissue. That way they cover their mouths without using their hands.
  • Don’t share. Don’t share drinking glasses or utensils with other family members. Use your own glass or disposable cups when you or someone else is sick. Label the cup or glass with the name of the person with the cold.
  • Steer clear of colds. Avoid close contact with anyone who has a cold.
  • Choose your child care center wisely. Look for a child care setting with good hygiene practices and clear policies about keeping sick children at home.
  • Take care of yourself. Eating well, getting exercise and enough sleep, and managing stress might help you keep colds at bay.

There is no cure for either the flu or the common cold. There are over-the-counter options that can ease throat pain and cough, decongest the nose and sinuses, and lessen body aches and headaches.

Cold medicines and pain relievers can have side effects and pose health risks, especially for people who have preexisting conditions such as high blood pressure.